Naloxone

Take Home Naloxone in the UK

Naloxone (provided under the brand names Prenoxad and Nyxoid in the UK) is a medication used to reverse opioid overdose. Since 2015, this medication has been more widely available in the UK as a ‘take home’ emergency medication.

NALOXONE.ORG.UK

This website aims to be a hub for information, guidance, news and research on Take Home Naloxone (THN). The main focus is on THN in the UK, although we have included select pieces of information on the supply of naloxone internationally.

PHE Guidance

Updated 18 February 2019
Public Health England have released updated guidance on take home naloxone in the UK, entiled ‘Widening the Availability of Naloxone’. This can be found on the PHE website.
  • Drug services can supply naloxone without a prescription
  • Products that drug services can supply
  • Responsibility for deciding who can supply naloxone
  • People who can be supplied naloxone by a drug service
  • Using naloxone to save a person’s life without their permission
  • Clinical governance in drug treatment services
  • Guidance for hostels, homeless shelters and housing associations
  • Side effects associated with naloxone

Review of naloxone safety for opioid overdose: practical considerations for new technology and expanded public access

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Opioid overdose and mortality have increased at an alarming rate prompting new public health initiatives to reduce drug poisoning. One initiative is to expand access to the opioid antidote naloxone. Naloxone has a long history of safe and effective use by organized healthcare systems and providers in the treatment of opioid overdose by paramedics/emergency medicine technicians, emergency medicine physicians and anesthesiologists. The safety of naloxone in a prehospital setting administered by nonhealthcare professionals has not been formally established but will likely parallel medically supervised experiences. Naloxone dose and route of administration can produce variable intensity of potential adverse reactions and opioid withdrawal symptoms: intravenous administration and higher doses produce more adverse events and more severe withdrawal symptoms in those individuals who are opioid dependent.

FEATURED RESOURCE

UK Overdose Awareness & Naloxone Poster Campaign

Launched: April 2021

There is a new overdose awareness and naloxone poster campaign launching this week in the UK that features the faces of real community naloxone carriers.

For obvious reasons we’d love to see some photographs of these billboards in the wild so we’re hoping that some of you can post photos to instagram. We’ll be keeping an eye of the #naloxone and #naloxoneposter tags, so if you post something expect our editor to reach out to you.

News/Updates

Emily Tackles Drug Policy: Covid, deaths, devolution and a new documentary

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The stark differences in social attitudes to drugs policy between England and Scotland show the cultural divide and underline arguments for independence, two documentary makers have told The National. Emily Brunsdon and Dominic Streeter, from Hide and Seek Films, have spent two years now working on their project on Scotland’s drug death rate. The two first came to Glasgow in 2019 when, Brunsdon says, the issue “was already a national crisis”.

National overdose awareness campaign hits the streets of Bristol

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A national overdose awareness campaign has hit the streets of Bristol. The poster campaign that can be seen on billboards around the city is promoting the opioid overdose reversal drug Naloxone. Naloxone works by blocking the opioid receptors in the brain, effectively reversing the effects of the drug. Naloxone is the most powerful tool in the fight to stop death from overdose.

National overdose awareness campaign hits the streets of Bristol

Written on . Posted in , .

A national overdose awareness campaign has hit the streets of Bristol. The poster campaign that can be seen on billboards around the city is promoting the opioid overdose reversal drug Naloxone. Naloxone works by blocking the opioid receptors in the brain, effectively reversing the effects of the drug. Naloxone is the most powerful tool in the fight to stop death from overdose.

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