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Police Scotland announces national roll-out of life-saving nasal spray which helps those who have suffered a drug overdose

Police Scotland’s Chief Constable has announced that all operational officers in the force will be trained and equipped with a life-saving nasal spray. The national roll-out of Naloxone follows successful tests in Dundee, Falkirk, Glasgow, Stirling and Caithness, where the officers used the spray to counter the effects of overdose from opioids, such as heroin.

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Firefighters to carry life-saving naloxone

Firefighters are being offered the chance to become trained and equipped to help prevent drug deaths. They will be able to volunteer to carry naloxone – a nasal spray which can reverse the effects of an opioid overdose – as part of a £90,000 project funded by the Scottish Government.

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Ambulance service hands out 1000 naloxone kits to help save lives

The Scottish Ambulance Service has distributed 1000 kits of the overdose-reversing medication naloxone across Scotland. It comes after the launch of a naloxone training programme last year, with a target being set of the distribution of 1000 of the Take Home Naloxone (THN) kits across the country by the service.

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New Wearable Device Could Help Prevent Overdose Deaths

It’s possible to reverse an opioid overdose with the drug naloxone, but it has to be given as soon as someone shows signs of an overdose or stops breathing. If a person is having an overdose alone, or if no one nearby has a naloxone dose or the training to administer it, that person’s likelihood of dying is much greater. This prompted the researchers to develop an auto-injector system that people with opioid use disorder can wear against their belly. The new device works a lot like an insulin pump.

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Change Grow Live Release Their 2022 Naloxone Strategy

From their site: “Until now, we have focused on making sure that naloxone is available to people who are already using our services. We have increased the amount of naloxone kits we hand out year on year. This has made it possible for more people than ever to help someone who is having an overdose. We want to carry on with this, but we also want to provide more naloxone to communities. We want to bring naloxone to people, instead of waiting for them to come to us.”

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Medics help spot emergency patients who can benefit from naloxone

A new project at University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine has demonstrated that one place medical schools can train students about saving lives from an opioid-related overdose is hospital emergency departments (EDs). A recent study found that EDs are particularly apt settings for overdose education and naloxone distribution (OEND), a harm-reduction strategy aimed at both teaching patients how to recognize and respond to opioid-related overdose and distributing naloxone to laypeople for use outside of health care settings.

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