Test your knowledge: new online questionnaire on overdose and take-home naloxone

The EMCDDA has launched a new online knowledge questionnaire on overdose and take-home naloxone aimed at potential bystanders of overdose, but also at a wider interested public. The main aim of the questionnaire is to refresh respondents’ knowledge on opioids, overdose risks and the role of take-home naloxone as part of the overall response to overdose deaths.

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Take-home naloxone can save lives — an overview of programmes

Many people overdose in the presence of their partners or peers. Empowering friends, family and other bystanders to act effectively, before emergency services arrive at the scene, can therefore save lives. Overdose prevention programmes, combining first aid training with the provision of the overdose-reversal drug naloxone, were piloted in Europe in the late 1990s. Now available at local or national level in 12 European countries, these take-home naloxone (THN) programmes are targeted at-risk opioid users and those likely to witness an overdose.

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How to identify and respond to an opioid overdose

Rosie Gilliver from Kirketon Road Centre presented at the 2020 NDARC Webinar Series on Thursday, 16 July 2020. This seminar provides information on how to identify and respond to an opioid overdose, as well as how to administer Nyxoid Naloxone nasal spray in the event of overdose.

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Brand new naloxone window stickers will be popping up across Scotland any day now!

The window clings with the well-known ‘save someone’ logo will be provided to local naloxone leads who will distribute to services in their health board area that have naloxone available for use in an emergency. Most of these services will have naloxone available to take home as well. The ‘save someone’ logo was established in 2012 and has been used by colleagues and agencies internationally to promote the life-saving medication.

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Book: OD Naloxone and the Politics of Overdose

The history of an unnatural disaster-drug overdose-and the emergence of naloxone as a social and technological solution. For years, drug overdose was unmentionable in polite society. OD was understood to be something that took place in dark alleys-an ugly death awaiting social deviants-neither scientifically nor clinically interesting. But over the last several years, overdose prevention has become the unlikely object of a social movement, powered by the miracle drug naloxone.

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